Readers ask: What Makes A Chord A Blues Chord?

What makes a blues chord?

THE 12-BAR FORM The primary harmonic structure of the blues is the I-IV-V progression, which derived from church music of the South. Unlike most tonal music, which uses dominant 7th chords (1–3–5–b7) as functional harmony, the blues uses them to add color, most commonly in a 12-bar form (FIGURE 1).

What are the chord changes for the Blues?

When people analyze chord progressions in music, these chords are given roman numerals (I through vii). The blues progression uses chords I, IV and V of the key you are in. In the key of E, the I chord is E7, the IV chord is A7, and the V chord is B7.

What chord structure does the blues use?

The standard 12-bar blues is a I-IV-V chord progression most typically divided into three four-bar segments.

What are the 3 chords used in the blues?

A common type of three – chord song is the simple twelve-bar blues used in blues and rock and roll. Typically, the three chords used are the chords on the tonic, subdominant, and dominant (scale degrees I, IV and V): in the key of C, these would be the C, F and G chords.

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What are the most common blues chords?

The dominant 7th chord is the most common used chord in blues. But also the ninth and thirteenth chords are found regularly in blues music to give that extra flavor to a chord progression.

What key are most blues songs in?

Blues songs are usually in E, A, G, C or D, with E, A and G the most common. Other keys are used but these are the most common, particularly with guitar players.

Why is the 12 bar blues important?

The 12 bar blues is the structure upon which blues music is built. It has been used since the inception of the genre and appears in almost every iconic blues song ever written. It provides the framework for the blues and will help you learn a wide variety of blues songs, as well as jam confidently with other musicians.

Why is it called 12 Bar Blues?

12 – Bar Blues is a musical form that was created for Blues music. The 12 – Bar Blues form is called that because it has a chord progression that takes place over 12 bars, or measures. The chord progression uses only the I, IV, and V chords of a key, also called the tonic, subdominant, and dominant, respectively.

What makes the 12-Bar Blues unique?

The twelve – bar blues (or blues changes) is one of the most prominent chord progressions in popular music. The blues progression has a distinctive form in lyrics, phrase, chord structure, and duration. In its basic form, it is predominantly based on the I, IV, and V chords of a key.

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What is the pattern for 12-bar blues?

The lyrics of a 12 – bar blues song often follow what’s known as an AAB pattern. “A” refers to the first and second four- bar verse, and “B” is the third four- bar verse. In a 12 – bar blues, the first and second lines are repeated, and the third line is a response to them—often with a twist.

How many different chords are there in the blues chord sequence?

The 3 basic chords of a blues are all dominant 7 chords. There is also a blues form that has minor chords as its foundation, called minor blues.

What is the 3 chord trick?

The three chord trick refers to the practice of accompanying a melody by only three chords. There are large numbers of melodies, both popular and classical, that can be harmonised in this way.

How do you define blues music?

Blues is an African-American music that traverses a wide range of emotions and musical styles. “Feeling blue” is expressed in songs whose verses lament injustice or express longing for a better life and lost loves, jobs, and money. But blues is also a raucous dance music that celebrates pleasure and success.

Is 12 Bar Blues major or minor?

12 Bar Blues Structure That’s right, the 12 bar blues is really just a I-IV-V progression played in a predetermined (formulaic, if you will) way. Take a few minutes to memorize this formula, and try it in a variety of different major, minor or dominant keys. You’ll likely hear a very familiar pattern—enjoy!

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