What Is The 12-bar Blues Used For?

Why is the 12 bar blues important?

The 12 bar blues is the structure upon which blues music is built. It has been used since the inception of the genre and appears in almost every iconic blues song ever written. It provides the framework for the blues and will help you learn a wide variety of blues songs, as well as jam confidently with other musicians.

What is meant by the 12 bar blues?

The 12 bar blues is a form in blues music where the first (I) chord of a key is repeated for four measures, or bars, followed by two bars of the fourth (IV), then two bars of the first.

What songs use the 12 Bar Blues?

50+ Legendary 12 Bar Blues Songs – The Essential List

Song / Artist UG Chords/Tabs Guitar Pro Tabs
1. Pride and Joy – Stevie Ray Vaughan Chords / Tabs GP Tabs
2. Rock and Roll – Led Zeppelin Chords / Tabs GP Tabs
3. Tush – ZZ Top Chords / Tabs GP Tabs
4. Johnny B. Goode – Chuck Berry Chords / Tabs GP Tabs
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What are the 3 most popular chords in a 12 bar blues piece?

The standard 12 – bar blues progression has three chords in it – the 1 chord, the 4 chord, and then the 5 chord. In the key of E blues, the 1 chord is an E, the 4 chord is an A, and the 5 chord is a B. Let’s talk about blues rhythm.

What makes the 12-Bar Blues unique?

The twelve – bar blues (or blues changes) is one of the most prominent chord progressions in popular music. The blues progression has a distinctive form in lyrics, phrase, chord structure, and duration. In its basic form, it is predominantly based on the I, IV, and V chords of a key.

What are the 3 chords used in the blues?

A common type of three – chord song is the simple twelve-bar blues used in blues and rock and roll. Typically, the three chords used are the chords on the tonic, subdominant, and dominant (scale degrees I, IV and V): in the key of C, these would be the C, F and G chords.

How many bars is 12-bar blues?

A 12 – bar blues is divided into three four- bar segments. A standard blues progression, or sequence of notes, typically features three chords based on the first (written as I), fourth (IV), and fifth (V) notes of an eight-note scale.

How many bars are there in a 12-bar blues?

The “ 12 – bar blues ” is a simply a particular chord progression which is 12 bars long. It’s helpful to think of it as being arranged into 3 lines, each of 4 bars. It uses just the I, IV and V chords – and if you don’t know what I mean by that please check out episode 33 about the “one, four, five and six” chords.

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How many beats does a bar last for in blues?

Blues music is usually in common time, which means that there are 4 beats to a bar.

Is Jailhouse Rock a 12 bar blues?

The Blues went on the influence other styles of music. In 1950’s, Rock and Roll musicians used 12 bar blues harmony as a basis for their songs. In songs like; Jailhouse Rock and Rock Around the Clock.

Is bad guy 12 Bar Blues?

“ Bad Guy ” is in the key of G Harmonic Minor. Harmonic Minor is the same as Natural Minor, except with a raised 7th tone (as well as flat 7 at times). The song is not a full 12 bar structure, but it does follow the first 6 measures of the 12 bar structure.

Is all Blues 12 bar?

The most common form of the blues is a 12 – bar pattern of chord changes. That is, a repeated twelve – bar chord progression. The blues can be played in any key. In whatever key you are in, 12 – bar blues uses the same basic sequence of I, IV, and V chords.

What chords are most used in a blues progression?

1. Blues Progression (I, IV, V) The I, IV, V chord progression is one of the simplest and most common chord progressions across all musical genres. When it comes to the guitar, it’s known as the “ blues progression ” because blues music makes heavy use of it.

Is 12 Bar Blues major or minor?

12 Bar Blues Structure That’s right, the 12 bar blues is really just a I-IV-V progression played in a predetermined (formulaic, if you will) way. Take a few minutes to memorize this formula, and try it in a variety of different major, minor or dominant keys. You’ll likely hear a very familiar pattern—enjoy!

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